The year in review, 2006

There have been twenty nine aesthetic experiments completed since January, mainly, though not exclusively, in the medium of painting. As is to be expected of the experimental method, some have been more successful than others. Overall, however, I feel this years work marks a solid contribution to the field of aesthetic mischief.

The year started with a series of studies of human pathogens. Along the way, there were some scientists and philosophers, a fair few portraits of my reprobate friends, an instructional video and a metaphysical plaything.

Most notably, personally, was the opening, and unfortunate closing of shardcorner
which provided a brief opportunity to subvert the consciousness of complete strangers with my tiny-shop-window-by-the-traffic-lights. A most worthwhile experiment, and one that bears repeating.

2007 will see shardcore exhibiting as an ‘official’ member of Brighton Artists Open Houses in May – expect a frenzy of experimentation in 2007 as I attempt to fill my house to overflowing with arcane exercises in pareidolia.

Summary of analysis, big up to the Max Ernst massive.

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Oppenheimer (2006)


acrylic on canvas 600mm x 600mm x 2

There is much to say on the subject of Robert Oppenheimer, he is best known as ‘the father of the atomic bomb’, however he appears to have been far more complex than that simple title suggests.

In his capacity as a theoretical physicist he was indeed the scientific director of The Manhattan Project, responsible for developing the first nuclear weapons. He also maintained a healthy eclecticism in his approach to his professional and private intellectual endeavours. Widely read, a polyglot, academically and politically influential, Oppenheimer was a profound and complex individual central to a radical change in the global human condition.

He famously quoted the Bhagavad Gita in response to witnessing the Trinity test of his new atomic weapon – “Now I am become death, the destroyer of worlds.”

www.atomicarchive.com have a short clip of Oppenheimer himself discussing it.

The painting itself is another experiment with anamorphic painting, this time using two canvases attached at a right angle, producing a ‘correct’ perspective when viewed from forty five degrees. Effectively, it’s a ‘corner painting’, to be viewed from all angles. As you move about the painting it produces a rather peculiar distortion effect, shown in the animation below.

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Seasonal Greetings from shardcore

This is the image from this years shardcore xmas card. Merry Xmas to all my visitors, keep watching, there are many more shardcore flavoured treats planned for next year…



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Spinoza (2006)


acrylic on canvas, 812mm x 304mm

This is the second of two anamorphic paintings recently completed. This one is of Baruch Spinoza, the 17th Century deterministic philosopher and ethicist. Wittgenstein was a fan, going so far as to name his work, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, as an homage to Spinoza’s Tractatus Theologico-Politicus.

To view the portrait in its ‘correct’ perspective requires squinting at it from the edge – the animation below shows the effect.

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Descartes (2006)


acrylic on canvas, 812mm x 304mm

This is the first of two anamorphic paintings recently completed. This one is of René Descartes, the 17th Century philosopher and mathematician, most famous for his conclusion in The Meditations on First Philosophy of ‘Cogito Ergo Sum’ – which roughly translates as ‘I’m thinking, therefore I am’.

To view the portrait in its ‘correct’ perspective requires squinting at it from the edge – the animation below shows the effect.

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